How Does Climate Change Affect Me?

There is all this talk about Climate Change. I guess we all want to know how much of it is true and how relevant is it to my business? This article discusses what has happened, is happening and some of the predictions so you can assess the importance for yourself. It also discusses the causes of this and includes some discussion of available options.

How to make air conditioning less of an environmental nightmare |  Environment | The Guardian

Global warming is a fact greenhouse air conditioner. It is likely to speed up, with near record growth in greenhouse gas levels in the atmosphere.

The recent UK Stern Report warned that if we ignore this we are likely to have an economic impact equivalent to the combined first and second world wars plus the great depression, and that is without considering millions of people displaced around the world.

To put climate change into perspective, during the last ice age global temperatures were only 5°C lower than today and much of Canada, Europe and northern Russia was covered in massive ice sheets several kilometres thick.

Half of the 65 species unique to the Australian Wet Tropics will become extinct with a 3.5°C increase in temperature. A 2-3°C change is expected to cause 80% of Kakadu wetlands to be lost.

Weather extremes and greater fluctuations in rainfall and temperatures caused by climate change are liable to change productive landscapes and exacerbate food, water and energy scarcities in a relatively short time span. Particularly worrying is sea-level rise because of the density of coastal populations and the potential for the large-scale displacement of people in Asia.

Climate change will cause health security consequences, since some infectious diseases will become more widespread as the planet heats up.

Rising global temperatures will see more fires, droughts and flooding over the next 200 years, according to climate scientists from the UK’s University of Bristol.

It is predicted that climate change will contribute to destabilising, unregulated population movements in Asia and the Pacific. While most of population movement is likely to be internal, there will be flow on effects requiring cooperative regional solutions.

Increasingly extreme weather patterns will result in greater death and destruction from natural disasters, and add to the burden on poorer countries and even stretch the coping ability of more developed nations.

Global warming is a fact. It is likely to speed up, with near record growth in greenhouse gas levels in the atmosphere.

The recent UK Stern Report warned that if we ignore this we are likely to have an economic impact equivalent to the combined first and second world wars plus the great depression, and that is without considering millions of people displaced around the world.

To put climate change into perspective, during the last ice age global temperatures were only 5°C lower than today and much of Canada, Europe and northern Russia was covered in massive ice sheets several kilometres thick.

Half of the 65 species unique to the Australian Wet Tropics will become extinct with a 3.5°C increase in temperature. A 2-3°C change is expected to cause 80% of Kakadu wetlands to be lost.

Weather extremes and greater fluctuations in rainfall and temperatures caused by climate change are liable to change productive landscapes and exacerbate food, water and energy scarcities in a relatively short time span. Particularly worrying is sea-level rise because of the density of coastal populations and the potential for the large-scale displacement of people in Asia.

Climate change will cause health security consequences, since some infectious diseases will become more widespread as the planet heats up.

Rising global temperatures will see more fires, droughts and flooding over the next 200 years, according to climate scientists from the UK’s University of Bristol.

It is predicted that climate change will contribute to destabilising, unregulated population movements in Asia and the Pacific. While most of population movement is likely to be internal, there will be flow on effects requiring cooperative regional solutions.

Increasingly extreme weather patterns will result in greater death and destruction from natural disasters, and add to the burden on poorer countries and even stretch the coping ability of more developed nations.

For the Gulf Coast rebuild, the opportunity to build energy efficient single family homes is clear: a “right rebuild” will have long-term benefits to the homeowners, the local utilities, the region, and the nation. For homeowners, building homes that have tight envelopes, good insulation, proper windows, and energy efficient equipment will reduce their monthly energy bills and increase the comfort and health of the occupants. The benefit of reduced energy bills cannot be understated. In present-day Mississippi, 34% of the household income pays the mortgage. The second-highest cost is energy bills.

As consumer energy bills rise, some regions are more challenged than others. For example, a study in North Carolina found that of every 100 trailers sold, 20 were repossessed. The problem was not mortgage costs that were too high, rather, the problem was that the monthly energy costs were more than the mortgage. With utility bills as high as $230 a month, the 30-year mortgage on a $25,000 mobile home was minor in comparison.

The fragility of the household incomes in the Gulf Coast region certainly plays a part in determining what ought to be re-built there. The average annual energy bills for the region were around $1,200. Scenario 3 (ENERGY STAR) returns a higher amount than the “Quick Payback” scenario, for example. For that, and other reasons, ENERGY STAR 2006 is the recommended threshold for the rebuild. In other words, there should be no single family home re-built with government-assisted funding that does not conform to the ENERGY STAR for New Homes Guidelines, as a minimum.

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